Resources

BOOKS

 
 
 

Additional Books

by Tom Segev
A Left-wing new historian Israeli take on the history of transformative year of 1967. He posits that the threat that Israel felt from their Arab neighbors leading up to the war was actually overblown.

Israeli, academic

Difficulty: Advanced

by Howard Sachar

American, pro-Israel, academic

Difficulty: Intermediate

by Jeremy Ben-Ami

American, personal story, political analysis

Difficulty: Advanced

by Abdu H. Murray

American, Christian, pro-pro-pro, political analysis

Difficulty: Intermediate

by Shira Robinson
A history of Palestinian Arab citizens of Israel.

American, pro-Palestine, academic

Difficulty: Intermediate

by Sayed Kashua, Miriam Shlesinger
Sayed Kashua is a Palestinian Arab Citizen of Israel, famous as one of Israel’s best Hebrew writers, who has a unique identity as both Palestinian in heritage and Israeli in ID card. The main character in “Dancing Arabs” moves between the two societies, feeling alienation and a profound desire to be accepted.

Palestinian, Israeli, pro-pro-pro, creative work

Difficulty: Intermediate

by William Cleveland
An account of the history in the region of the Middle East, including Israel-Palestine. DIscusses the transformative changes in the Middle East, through the Arab uprisings in the most recent edition. “History of the Modern Middle East” is mostly a political history, but also offers economic and cultural perspectives.

American, academic

Difficulty: Advanced

by Mitri Raheb

Palestinian, Christian, personal story

Difficulty: Basic

by Dr. Izzeldin Abuelaish

Palestinian, personal story

Difficulty: Basic

by Amos Oz

Israeli, Jewish, personal story

Difficulty: Intermediate

by Martin Indyk
Martin Indyk writes a memoir based on his experience as Middle East adviser to President Clinton, and two-time U.S. ambassador to Israel. He describes different decisions made in Iraq and Iran, and discusses Israeli-Palestinian negotiations under the Clinton administration.

American, pro-Israel, political analysis, personal story

Difficulty: Basic

by Karen Armstrong

American, academic

Difficulty: Basic

by Simon Sebag Montefiore
British popular historian chronologically tells the story of the mythical city of Jerusalem, weaving together various accounts, including secular and religious narratives.

American, academic

Difficulty: Advanced

by Idith Zertal

American, academic, political analysis

Difficulty: Advanced

by Ari Shavit
A narrative and personal historical piece by one of the most influential Zionist Jewish journalists in Israel. It examines many chapters of Israeli history, including its formation. It has become widely read in the United States since its publication in 2013.

American, Jewish, academic, political analysis

Difficulty: Intermediate

by Dominique Lapierre and Larry Collins

Academic Analysis, pro-pro-pro

Difficulty: Intermediate

by Breaking the Silence
Breaking the Silence is an Israeli NGO comprised of former soldiers who speak out about their experiences serving in the Israeli army. “Our Harsh Logic” is a harrowing collection of the testimonies of soldiers who served in the Gaza Strip or the Occupied Territories that gives a sobering account of the Israeli military system and the mundane reality of being a soldier in challenging situations.

Israeli, personal story

Difficulty: Advanced

by Rashid Khalidi
Rashid Khalidi, a Palestinian American academic, writes a core text on Palestinian nationalism and its origins. He makes the case that Palestinian identity has a longer history than Zionist intellectuals give it credit for, and he underlines this in historical events and their impact on Palestinian national identity.

Palestinian, pro-Palestine, political analysis

Difficulty: Advanced

by Alex Awad

Palestinian, Christian, pro-Palestine, personal story

Difficulty: Basic

by Raja Shehadeh

Palestinian, pro-Palestine, personal story

Difficulty: Basic

by William B. Quandt

American, academic

Difficulty: Intermediate

by Yehuda Amichai

Israeli, creative work

Difficulty: Basic

by John Paul Lederach
International mediator, John Paul Lederach, looks to moments of conflict in the scriptures in order to offer tools for reconciliation and transformation to our modern day conflicts.

American, Christian, peacemaking

Difficulty: Basic

by Ghassan Kannafani
A novella about a Palestinian family who fled Haifa during the Nakba and were allowed to visit with the opening of the borders in 1967. In their former home, they find that a Jewish couple who came after the founding of the State of Israel are living in their home. Ghassan Kannafani was a Palestinian author and member of the PFLP and was assassinated by the Mossad in Lebanon.

Palestinian, pro-Palestine, creative work

Difficulty: Intermediate

by Benny Morris

Israeli, academic

Difficulty: Advanced

by Mosab Hassan Yousef
Israeli informant from Gaza, Mosab Hassan Yousef, son of Hamas leader, Sheikh Hassan Yousef, writes a tell-all about his life and how he was groomed by the Israeli secret service. During his time in Gaza, he experienced a process of disillusionment when it came to the Hamas party and his more positive impression of Israel and the West.

Palestinian, Muslim, pro-Israel, personal story

Difficulty: Intermediate

by Dan Senor and Saul Singer
A seminal book by an American Jew and an American Israeli that celebrates Israel’s economic successes. Despite the effects of conflict, Israel functions with high-tech and industrial output on par with the United States or China. This book was acclaimed by both the New York Times and Wall Street Journal.

American, Jewish, Israeli, pro-Israel, political analysis

Difficulty: Intermediate

by Raja Shehadeh

Palestinian, pro-Palestine, personal story

Difficulty: Intermediate

by Etgar Keret

Israeli, creative work

Difficulty: Basic

by Kirsten Schulze

American, academic

Difficulty: Intermediate

by Mahmoud Darwish
Mahmoud Darwish is Palestine’s poet laureate. Originally from the Galilee, and banned from Israel when he joined the PLO, Darwish writes often about exile and longing for homeland. “The Butterfly’s Burden” is a bilngual collection of his work, written in Modern Standard Arabic and translated to English.

Palestinian, pro-Palestine, creative work

Difficulty: Intermediate

by Alan Dershowitz
A right wing American Jewish response to criticism about the State of Israel from a Harvard Law professor. Each chapter is broken down into the accusation and the reality on a commonly discussed contentious topic concerning Israel. This book is representative of an influential portion of American Jewish opinion on Israel.

American, Jewish, pro-Israel, political analysis

Difficulty: Intermediate

by Walter Laqueur and Barry Rubin
A compllation of first hand sources that tell the story of the Israeli-Arab conflict.

American, academic

Difficulty: Advanced

by Amos Elon

Israeli, academic

Difficulty: Intermediate

by Ed. Salim J. Munayer and Lisa Loden

Palestinian, Christian, Israeli, academic

Difficulty: Intermediate

by John Paul Lederach

American, Christian, peacemaking

Difficulty: Basic

by Aaron David Miller
Key American negotiator, Aaron David Miller, tells the history of the peace process, evaluating its strong and weak moments. The book includes interviews, insider experience, and stories from the negotiations table.

American, personal story, political analysis

Difficulty: Basic

by Baruch Kimmerling and Joel Migdal

Israeli, academic

Difficulty: Advanced

by Edward Said

Palestinian perspective, academic analysis

Difficulty: Advanced

by Gershom Gorenberg
Left-leaning Israeli journalist and historian Gershon Gorenberg writes about the settlement movement and its adverse effect on Israeli society. Gorenberg is of an American Jewish background, and continues to practice Orthodox Judaism in Southern Judaism. He sees the settlement enterprise as an existential threat to the state of Israel and describes a remedy to this entrenched problem.

Israeli, Jewish, political analysis

Difficulty: Intermediate

by David Grossman
David Grossman is one of Israel’s most famous authors and has spoken out publicly as a Left-wing activist. “The Yellow Wind” is a non-fiction first-account of what David Grossman saw in the West Bank. It explores the cost of the occupation both for the occupied and for the occupier.

Israeli, Jewish, creative work

Difficulty: Intermediate

by Salim Munayer and Lisa Loden

Palestinian, Christian, Israeli, pro-pro-pro

Difficulty: Basic

by Gary Burge

American, Christian, political analysis

Difficulty: Basic

by Thomas L. Friedman

American, Jewish, pro-Israel, personal story, political analysis

Difficulty: Intermediate

by Arthur Hertzberg

American, Jewish, pro-Israel, academic

Difficulty: Advanced

by Ilan Pappe

Israeli, academic

Difficulty: Advanced

Ali Abunimah

Palestinian, American, pro-Palestine, political analysis

Difficulty: Intermediate

by Walter Brueggemann

American, Christian, theology

Difficulty: Basic

FILMS

 
 
 

Additional Films

Dir. Hugo Blick
A BBC mini-series that tells the fictional story of Anglo-Israeli Baroness Nessa Stein, heir to the family business, and striving to create economic peace between Israelis and Palestinians.

British, creative work

Difficulty: Intermediate

Dir. Tom Amber Fares
A documentary about an all female Palestinian racing team, the difficulties they face in their political, and the freedom they find in racing.

Palestinian, pro-Palestine, personal story

Difficulty: Basic

Dir. Wayne Kopping
Follows the lives of five Israeli sodliers. Chronicles their perspective on military service and how it impacts their lives.

Israeli, pro-Israel, personal story

Difficulty: Basic

Dir. Oren Rudavsky, Joseph Dorman

Israeli, academic

Difficulty: Intermediate

Dir. Eytan Fox

Israeli, creative work

Difficulty: Intermediate

Dir. Laura Bialis

Israeli, pro-Israel, personal story

Difficulty: Basic

Scandar Copti and Yaron Shani

Palestinian, personal story

Difficulty: Intermediate

Iris Zaki

Israeli, personal story

Difficulty: Basic

NEWS

 

ONLINE MATERIAL

Browse additional online material by selecting the categories or difficulty levels below to show resources from different perspectives.

TELOS MATERIALS

Sharing Your Story: A practical guide

Download the ‘Sharing Your Story: A practical guide’ here.

Telos is committed to helping you use your voice responsibly to grow the pro/pro/pro movement. This document is intended to help you as you share your Telos story and other pro-Israeli, pro-Palestinian, pro-peace narratives from the region.

Why?

We share our story because it has the potential to change lives for the better – we know this because it has already changed ours! Our Telos stories contain elements of the ‘other’ that challenges negative stereotypes and counters single narrative mindsets.

We share our story because it is intimately tied to the narratives and experiences of our friends in Israel/Palestine. And where their voices cannot be heard, it is important that we speak into those spaces as we are able.

We share our story because it opens doors to new relationships with those not in our conventional circles. These relationships are essential to building a diverse movement that crosses faiths, sectors and political allegiances.

How?

We invite those looking to partner with their voice to consider sharing their stories in three ways:

  • In conversation
  • Online
  • Before your political representatives

Each has its own strengths and limitations and falls somewhere on the reach-relationship spectrum. For instance, when we share our story with a friend in conversation, we are only reaching one person but in sharing relationship with them, the potential for impact is significant. In contrast, when we Tweet, Facebook and blog about our experiences, we may reach hundreds or even thousands of people, but that experience is devoid of authentic relationship and provides limited opportunity for interaction, but lots of opportunity for our words to be misconstrued! However we share, both personal conversation and online sharing are important for spreading the pro/pro/pro message.

7 Tips to effectively sharing your story!

  1. Communicate to be heard

How you are heard is more important than what you want to say. The most effective way to be heard is to be a good listener – ask good questions, be legitimately engaged in order to understand where your listener is: what are their biases? Are they new to the issue? How can I meet them where they are? Take the time to listen. Again, being heard can be harder online because it’s a one-sided conversation, and that’s not a true conversation.

  1. Tell your own story

The real unassailable story is the story of your own journey and transformation. While you may want to give voice to your friends’ stories, you are never going to be able to tell their story with accuracy and full impact. So tell the story of how you met people whose example changed you. Similarly, as much as you try (and you should try as much as possible), accept that you do not possess mastery of all the facts. The important thing to communicate is your experience, which is hard for people to reject.

  1. Focus on the big picture: PEOPLE.

Conflict is about people so our task is to not get bogged down in theological histories or tit-fot-tat/ who-is-to-blame details but instead, focus on the people at the center of the conflict: other friends whose lives are consistently upended by war. Telling your story in a way that always comes back to that core truth of loving people is an effective way to engage someone who is even strongly opposed to you theologically or politically.

  1. Be intentionally pro/pro/pro

Remember there is no future for anyone without a future for everyone, so share stories from both sides! This may be especially important if your Telos experience shattered your worldview and now you wish to fly the flag for the ‘other’ whom you used to oppose. Avoid implicit bias and being put in an either/or camp that represents a false and destructive binary that has fueled this conflict for too long. Be explicitly pro/pro/pro and model a different and better way of engaging that tells the legitimate narratives of both sides.

  1. Give Grace

To both your self and others. We are ALL on a journey. Your audience hasn’t seen and experienced what you’ve seen. They need the opportunity to go on that journey. They need to wrestle, just as you did. And it’s harder if they haven’t yet shared your experience and had the chance to confront their biases head on in the eyes of a child who could be their own. Give them grace to go on that journey and the space to begin it in your communications.

  1. Communicate from a place of love and hope, not a place of trauma and anger

Humanize your friends in Israel/Palestine so your audience has an opportunity to fall in love with them. They are more than victims, they are dreamers and doers, believers and lovers, people like us with hopes and aspirations. Speak from love, not from anger, otherwise your story will likely fall on deaf ears. For if your trauma speaks, it will likely be too much for your listener to bear before their hearts have been broken too. MLK’s famous words were “I have a dream” NOT “We’re living a nightmare.”

  1. Most importantly… Build Authentic Relationships

Relationship is everything. People are not fodder to be converted on an issue; they are friends and neighbors who are to be loved unconditionally regardless of their theology or opinion on a complex and emotional geopolitical topic. And when they are truly loved by us, they are more likely to see the world as we see it. A good friend of Telos has said that peacemaking might just begin with the three words “Let’s have lunch”. Put relationships first, really care about who you’re talking with, and they might just listen to you.

5 quick tips on using your political voice…

If you would like to begin communicating with your elected representatives about your pro/pro/pro beliefs, we welcome you to do so. Here’s what we recommend:

  1. Vote
  2. Find out who your elected representatives are:

Visit this website, type in your zip-code, and voila, your representative.

To find your Senators, go here and scroll down until you find your State.

  1. Contact them and don’t be intimidated. It’s our job in a democracy to inform our leaders, and their job to listen and represent us.
  2. Try to do a little bit of research on them beforehand to help you build that relationship. Especially helpful is to know where they stand on issues pertaining to the Israeli/Palestinian conflict, peacemaking, and justice. This is useful information that will enable you to tailor your story to your audience.
  3. Build a relationship! Do not expect to walk into an office, pick up the phone, or write a letter and for your elected representative to be changed. Do not even expect that they, not a staffer, will hear you. It is right that we engage with and concern ourselves with the activities of those elected to represent us. And when we do, we should be comfortable sharing our experiences in Israel/Palestine and our desire to see pro/pro/pro policies that build towards peace in the Holy Land.

If you are planning on contacting your elected representative, let us know! We would welcome the opportunity to assist you in framing your dialogues.

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